Knowledgebase

Check the knowledge base articles to get a jump start on your integrations, modifications, and all around user questions. If you don’t find what you’re looking for hit the help desk.

Search Knowledgebase

Setting Up Your Google Maps API Key

Since June 2018, Google has required the use of an API key to use Google Maps features. The Events Calendar comes with a Google Maps API key built into it, but we strongly recommend adding your own API key, especially if you use Event Calendar PRO.

How to Add Your Own API Key

  1. Head to Google’s API Key documentation and click the “Get Started” button underneath the “Get an API key” header.
  2. Prompts will guide you through the creation of a “project” within Google—complete this process until you end up with a Google Maps API key.
  3. Head to Events → Settings → APIs in the wp-admin of your WordPress site. Copy the API Key created in step #2 and paste it into the Google Maps API Key setting field.
  4. Click “Save Changes”…and that’s it!

Why You Should Add Your Own API Key

If you don’t use your own API key, then some Events Calendar PRO features look different and have less functionality than they would prior to these June 2018 changes.

Here’s a breakdown of the differences in functionality and appearance of maps-related features based on what kind of API key you’re using:

Feature With Built-in API Key With Your Own API Key (Recommended)
Venue map on single events

✅ Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Venue map on single venues
PRO Only

✅ Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Map View
PRO Only

🔶 Limited functionality—only one venue will be visible on the map

📸 Screenshot

Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Searching by location in the Tribe Bar

⛔️ Not functional

📸 Screenshot

Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Custom Map Pins
PRO Only

⛔️ Not functional

📸 Screenshot

Fully functional

📸 Screenshot

Securing and Restricting Your API Key

There’s often a limit on the number of API requests your API key is authorized to make per day. If you have a particularly high-traffic site, it’s recommended that you take some steps to restrict your API keys’ functionality a bit, and limit their use to only specifically white-listed domain names.

Google provides a number of options to help secure your API key and prevent unauthorized usage, which we highly recommend if you think restricting your API key is a necessary step.

Troubleshooting Maps Issues After Adding an API Key

Have you added your own API key but still experience some issues with map-related features? If so, it’s worth confirming each of the following things:

  1. First, confirm that you’ve actually entered your full, un-edited API key into the correct settings field in the wp-admin.
  2. Next, head to your Google Cloud Platform Maps API management page and select the project that your API key belongs to. Using this screenshot as a reference, confirm that both Geocoding API and Maps JavaScript API show up in the In use APIs section of the project’s APIs page.
    • If neither is enabled, make a new API key and ensure that the new API key has both APIs enabled for it. If issues persist, contact Google’s support team by clicking the Support tab in the left-hand sidebar—they should be able to help ensure that both of these free APIs are enabled for your API key.
  3. Finally, confirm that your venues have valid longitude and latitude data. If you created venues before adding your own custom Google Maps API key, you will need to add your custom API key and then use the “Fix venue data” button (see screenshot) in The Events Calendar’s settings to update the data and make it accurate.

See also: Troubleshooting Google Maps